Who Are We?

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a migrant child’s drawing

For Evil to succeed, all it needs is for good people to do nothing.       Martin Luther King Jr.

I feel such deep sadness at the ongoing news coming from our outhern border. Pictures of children crowded in cages with a survival blanket for warmth. The DOJ argues that children don’t need toothbrushes, or soap, and can sleep on cement floors. I watch babies and toddlers being separated from their parents and left in the care of young children. Is this who we have become?

I remember when I was in Germany in 1969 I walked down the streets looking at the German people and asking myself, “How could you let the Holocaust happen? How could you stand by as six million Jews perished in gas chambers.” We will look back at this dark period, and ask similar questions regarding our treatment of the migrants at our southern border.

This is not a Republican or Democratic issue, this is a humanitarian crisis fueled by politics. This goes to the moral fiber of our country. It seems we continue to ignore the lessons from our past:  the Japanese Internment Camps in WWII;  taking Native American children from their families and putting them in boarding schools to  erase their language and culture; families being routinely sold separately during slavery. I ask again, “Who Are We?”

I feel powerless in the wake of what is happening at our border. Taking small actions such as donating, marching, writing letters gives me a sense that I am doing something, but has it made a difference? People around our country are appalled by what is happening, and yet it continues to happen with impunity. I am heartened by the rise of voices against the cruelty that is being witnessed.

Hope is a spiritual necessity and I do believe light wins over dark. It is the damage that has been done and continues to be done that breaks my heart. So many children separated from family, many of whom will never be reunited because no records were kept.

May our collective voices rise in outrage to stop this cruelty and say “Enough.”

Beauty

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All I need is beauty to keep my heart alive and all beauty needs is my attention.
Joyce Rupp

I have come to see beauty as one of my deepest spiritual practices. When I pay attention and see the beauty that surrounds me I am fully present to this amazing Universe. It took me a long time to recognize beauty as essential to my life. I was too busy working, doing, proving to stop and see what was right in front of me. Below are quotes from some of my favorite authors regarding beauty.redwoods 1unnamed.jpeg

Beauty awakens what is sleeping in our spirit. It relieves the reins of tiredness and stirs up what lays dormant in our over-emphasis on activity.   Joyce Rupp

The Earth is full of thresholds where beauty awaits the wonder of our gaze.    John O’Donohue

When we embrace beauty we come home to that part of our self that cries out for nurturance and renewal.  Joyce RuppIMG_0386.jpeg

Beauty is a central source of connection with the sacred.  Joyce RuppIMG_1075.jpeg

 

To cherish what is left of the Earth and to foster its renewal is our only legitimate hope for survival.     Wendell Berry

 

 

I have learned after many years of activism that anger does not change anything.  It is when we love and care for something that we work toward saving it. May we teach our children and to love and nourish this beautiful home we’ve been given.

I hope some of these quotes speak to you. May you find beauty throughout each day.

My Garden as Mirror

Where flowers bloom, so does hope. Eleanor Roosevelt

My garden holds deep meaning for me, for it has evolved as I have evolved. She nurtures and heals me as I nurtIMG_1070ure and feed it. So it seems appropriate to honor my garden and share its beauty as another gift from nature.

When I moved to my home with my husband, the garden was already mature. It was filled with rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, peonies and many fruit trees. In the first fifteen years of my life in this home, the garden took care of itself. There was no time to spend doing the tasks necessary to maintain a garden. My husband and I were both workaholics who looked forwIMG_1069ard to time off so we could get away. The last thing we wanted to do with our limited time was care for a garden. What we didn’t hire to be done, didn’t get done.

The house had a large attached greenhouse, which was indicative of my lack of focus on gardening. It was a beautiful structure that was slowly falling apart with shattered and cracked glass falling through a disintegrating wooden frame. I was too busy to care for or use the greenhouse and so it languished as the garden languished. Much as my soul languished in these years.

When I divorced my husband, I began to attend to the exiled parts of me. Two years later, I began attending to the exiled parts of my garden. The first year I planted a rose garden. The next, I got into bulb gardening and began introducing daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, and dahlias. Over the next few years I began to look forward to the colors spring would bring. Finally I refurbished the greenhouse with all new glass and paint. The garden sparkled. Was it the greenhouse? Was it the bulb garden that continually expanded? Or was I seeing through a different lens at the new palette I’d created? Probably some of each. The garden’s blossoming reflected the blossoming of my inner world.

When I stopped everything and embarked on a deep spiritual journey, my garden became my sanctuary. It became another metaphor for my life. Although gardens have been used as life’s metaphor for centuries, the cycles of my journey have matched the seasons of my garden. I have been nurtured and held by the life-and-death cycles of my garden. As new buds emerged, and flowers bloomed, I knew new stories were emerging within me. I watched the colorful, fragrant flowers complete their cycle and die. I honored the deaths and births within myself, knowing each death made room for the new.

 Not long after my divorce, my fruit trees died. Was it old age or lack of care? I was dying also, but did not know it at the time. My soul was shriveling. I now know I couldn’t live in the vast spiritual wasteland anymore. Similar to my apple and pear trees, I could no longer survive without some deep nurturing care for my soul. Today there are new fruit trees being nurtured by a fresh and alive soul. We have been partners and co-creators—my garden and me.

My garden returned me to my “Earth Mother” soul. I had lost her somewhere back in my twenties as I was striving for independence and success. Digging in the soil with bare hands I felt home again. I didn’t wear gloves because I wanted to feel the earth, to feel the bulbs, seeds, and starter plants I was planting. There was something so nurturing for me as I nourished and babied the new plants to maturity. I was reconnecting to myself, knowing something greater than me was guiding this journey.

Excerpt from my book: “Listening to My Life: My Journey  through  Fear to Trust”

My Ode to Kindness

When I look for kindness, I see it all around

The young person helps an elderly woman with groceries

The driver stopping to check on a dog near the road

The smile from the clerk when she checks me out

A hello as I walk down the street

The truck driver slowing down to let me into his lane

The laughter of children playing

The adult taking the hand of a child to cross the street

The neighbor who fixes my appliance

Kindness blooms where kindness is planted

Plant kindness where you are

smile at the harried clerk

say thank you to the kindness others offer

show appreciation for those who serve

encourage a friend

Kindness spreads like wildfire

Please plant it where you are

 

Returning Home

May I see through the clear clean glass of my soul and not the layers of dust piled upon my soul.”

One of my favorite wisdom teachers was the late Dr. Angeles Arrien, author of many books. The questions below come from her book “The Second Half of Life: Opening the Eight Gates of Wisdom.”
As you reflect on the experiences of your life and how they impact you, these four questions may open new avenues for you to explore.

1) When did I stop singing? This is when I lost my authentic voice.
2) When did I stop dancing? This is when I lost my connection to my body.
3) When did I stop being enchanted by story—particularly my story? this is when I lost my fire.
4) When did I stop being comforted by the sweet territories of silence? This is where I began to not trust the     mystery, and stopped being an explorer.

You may have never lost one or more of these, or you may have returned to one or more later in life. If you returned to one or more—at what age, and do you remember the circumstances?
May these questions help you clear the dust from your soul so you may see your true beauty.

SACRED SPACES

cascade-environment-falls-2214386At first you might find that nothing happens there. But if you have a sacred space and use it, eventually something will happen. Your sacred space is where you find yourself again and again.   Joseph Campbell

I find more and more I need a place to go that takes me from the busyness of my days.  A place where I can slow down. When I slow down, I show up to myself. This is what a sacred space gives me. I was first introduced to the power of sacred spaces in Japan. Below is an excerpt from my journal while in Japan.

Shinto shrines dot my walks through the city streets of  Kyoto.  I am in awe of the gardens and temples, the sacred spaces that are throughout this city.  Lingering at a small Buddhist temple tucked between two large high rises I feel a sense of peace engulf me. I am taken by how space is used in this crowded city. Hallowed grounds are found throughout the busy city blocks in the form of Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples. In the west we build large edifices called churches and visit them once a week. The remainder of the week we lock them up for safekeeping. Sacred spaces are part of the landscape of Asia, offering quiet retreats throughout a busy day. 

I linger in a garden, one of many that grace this city.  Walking the path I look out upon a beautiful pond surrounded by trees shaped by the winds.  It is fall and the colors astound my senses.  Reds, with backdrops of gold and yellow create a kaleidoscope of exploding, vivid shapes of various hues. I hear the cuckoo bird and get lost in its melody. I cherish the comfort these gardens bring.   Sitting quietly for a moment centers me, before, once again, entering the busy stream of foot traffic. 

I learn that the natural roots of Shinto come from the ancient dwellers of Japan.  It was their response to the stunning natural environment they found. Shinto honors Earth as a partner, seeing mystery in all of Earth’s gifts. The gardens symbolize their reverence for earth and all of creation.  As I come upon Shinto shrines throughout Tokyo and Kyoto, I enter the peace these small gardens offer. The Shinto belief calls for us to harmonize with “Great Nature’.

My sacred spaces always include someplace in nature. Some people create alters in their homes as sacred space. Where do you find your sacred spaces? Take time to pay attention to when you are in a place of peace and quiet.

Living Fully

When I’m questioning my life, wondering if I am playing it safe or living fully, I turn to a poem by Rainer Maria Rilke. I invite you to practice an abbreviate form of Lectio Divina, sacred or divine reading, as you read this poem. I’ll have some questions at the end to reflect on and write about. Read the poem slowly and pay attention to what line(s) or word pops out for you.

God speaks to all of us as he(she) makes us,
then walks with us silently out of the night.

These are the words we dimly hear:

You, sent out beyond your recall, go to the limits of your longing.
Embody me.

Flare up like flame
and make big shadows I can move in.

Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror.
Just keep going. No feeling is final.
don’t let yourself lose me.

Nearby is the country they call life.
You will know it by its seriousness.

Give me your hand.

Sit with the line or word you chose for a bit, then turn to the following questions.

  1. 1)  What feelings are evoked within you?
  2. 2)  How does this line/word touch you?
  3. 3)  What does this line/word say about your life?
  4. 4)  What struggle or longing in your life today is speaking to you?